a blog

by Josh Nicholas

The Accidental Billionares

Facebook has become all-pervasive. It screams at me from the laptops of my fellow classmates, tracks me as I traverse the interwebs, draws visitors to my blog and radio show, and invades the real world through my vibrating phone. The draw of its network and the push of it’s firehose has become inexorably linked with the internet itself. However, like many, I ache to escape its grasp. I have all but shut down my profile, installed blockers on everything but my cat, and rarely log on. But perhaps what I want more is to figure it out. And so I found myself opening ‘The Accidental Billionaires’ by Ben Mezrich. You might know it as the basis of ‘The Social Network,' which was a surprisingly faithful and brilliant adaptation. It is one of the most entertaining business book I have ever read. That isn’t a compliment.

“Nonfictionish” is how I have seen it described in a couple of places. And, really, I can think of no better descriptor. The Accidental Billionaires is a business book written like a novel. Or, as Mezrich put’s it in the introduction; “a dramatic, narrative account based on dozens of interviews, hundreds of sources, and thousands of pages of documents…”. Now, having read that, I was expecting something along the lines of a Michael Lewis or Malcolm Gladwell tale — a high concept told narratively to keep us plebs interested. Unfortunately Mezrich does not seem to have the deft touch of Lewis or Gladwell, as it’s the drama that wins out over everything else.

From the start, the booze-fueled parties, super-speculative points of view, and bizarre literary flourishes build mountains of melodrama and scant understanding. I really am unsure what insights should be gleamed from Mark Zuckerberg lost in his reflection in a computer screen, Eduardo Saverin - our hapless foil — wondering if he ever really knew Zuckerberg, or the virtuous Winklevoss twins fighting for justice in an otherwise cruel campus. The tension between Zuckerberg, Saverin and the Winklevi does well to build tension throughout, but the space needed detracts from everything else. The real meat of Facebook’s genesis and rise is lost amid the kind of superficial account you'd get from a blowhard at a party. I went in wanting to learn about Facebook, but I’ve come out not quite sure if I learned anything at all. Really, upon reflection it seems like Aaron Sorkin may have toned the book down a bit. I don’t remember the movie being as soapy.

Perhaps this is a Facebook book for a Facebook world. Screaming for attention by airing what was once hidden — the sex, drugs and lawsuits. Hiding the message under layers of drama so we don’t even know we’ve learned something — like putting your pet’s medicine in a treat. If all you want is a passing understanding of Facebook, maybe this is the book for you. The Facebook story is in there, superficially at least. But if you want to know more, about it’s conquering of college campuses and burst into the mainstream, about its rise into a genuine business and global powerhouse. If you are looking for lessons, if you want to understand what drives the pokes, look elsewhere. Two stars.

Title: The Accidental Billionaires

Author: Ben Mezrich

Pages: 272 (Paperback)

Josh’s Rating: 2/5

Amazon Link: The Accidental Billionaires