If you’re going to change the world, you must reflect it first

I find taking public transport or hopping a plane immensely stressful. Not because of the shoddy infrastructure, waiting around, or poor service. Because I’m 6″4 with disproportionately long legs in a world built by people who aren’t.

As I continue to read Coders, I’m increasingly worried how this same phenomena will play out in a world full of algorithmic black boxes. Code so complex and systems so arcane that even their creators struggle to understand them.

Techies love to talk about scale and putting their creations in front of millions. But for this to work they themselves need to be drawn from a representative pool.

Otherwise you get self driving cars that are more likely to hit black people. Or image recognition that thinks black People are gorillas.

…then Alciné scrolled over to a picture of himself and a friend, in a selfie they’d taken at an outdoor concert: She looms close in the view, while he’s peering, smiling, over her right shoulder. Alciné is African American, and so is his friend. And the label that Google Photos had generated? “Gorillas.” It wasn’t just that single photo, either. Over fifty snapshots of the two from that day had been identified as “gorillas.”

This isn’t only a Google problem. Or even a Silicon Valley problem. There are also stories of algorithms trained in China and South Korea that have trouble recognising Caucasian faces.

As a journalist with a diverse ethnic and cultural background I had trouble understanding why my editors took so much convincing to run foreign stories. With a family spread around the globe, I could see myself in the Rohingya as much as an Australian farmer.

These issues are linked – what we value, notice and think of as “normal” are all informed by our personal stories. If you grow up or work in a monoculture, that will influence the issues you see, the solutions you propose and contingencies you plan for.

But the world isn’t a monoculture. There are 6″4 people who would like to ride the bus. There will be people who aren’t like you but need to cross the street safely, or be judged fairly.

Who will be deeply offended by racial epithets, which are themselves linked to why they aren’t represented in a database.

If you’re going to try and change the world for the better, you need to be of the world. There will always be edge cases, but without diversity they will be systemic. They will be disastrous.

…why couldn’t Google’s AI recognize an African American face? Very likely because it hadn’t been trained on enough of them. Most data sets of photos that coders in the West use for training face-recognition are heavily white, so the neural nets easily learn to make nuanced recognitions of white people—but they only develop a hazy sense of what black people look like.

As always my emphasis.

Tab dump

Interesting research, articles and videos in no particular order.

 

Why techies think they can change the world

People who excel at programming, notes the coder and tech-culture critic Maciej Cegłowski, often “become convinced that they have a unique ability to understand any kind of system at all, from first principles, without prior training, thanks to their superior powers of analysis. Success in the artificially constructed world of software design promotes a dangerous confidence.

This is from Coders, a book I only just downloaded but am absolutely tearing through.

The subtitle is “how software programmers think, and how their thinking is changing our world”, which is a clue to what Ceglowski is referring to.

When you’re writing code you’re trying to break a process down, to first principles and then into easy steps as you go along.

You build it back up in an environment over which you have a huge amount of control, that thrives on trial, error and iteration.

Where something usually either works or breaks obviously. Everything is very structured and built upon logic.

But by this point you’ve also abstracted so much you can trick yourself into thinking you’ve mastered all the nuances, not just how to get from A to B.

It’s also an alluring way of thinking, which you begin applying to other problems in your life. In a similar way to how you can start thinking in another language if you are sufficiently steeped in it.

This is a fantastic book so far. Hope to post some more.

As always my emphasis.

The slow creep of climate alarmism

For the last several years, Whitham said, he and his colleagues had used a series of experimental gardens to study how plants are being affected by warming temperatures—in near real-time—and how their populations might evolve due to climate change…

…In these gardens, located in various ecosystems and elevations around the Southwest—from deserts to alpine forests—Whitham planted different genotypes of the same species… Preliminary results from his experimental gardens, 10 in total, suggest that species have already shifted their range in response to changing temperatures.

This is from an article that is almost three years old.

I recently wrote a script to surface old articles from the bottom of my Pocket queue. For years I have added more articles than I’ve read, creating a time capsule of sorts.

This is one of the first articles it spat out. But there’s been a pretty clear oeuvre – the variation, unpredictability and changing extremes associated with climate change have been presented to us consistently, over a long period.

We’ve now known about anthropogenic climate change for an entire generation. And yet there is somehow still a debate about the suitability of alarmism.

There will of course be winners and losers to whatever action is taken, making resistance and motivated scepticism completely rational. But the clear lack of panic among those not already directly affected is not.

There is something broken among both our informational environments and our public discourse that we can continue to treat all of these instances as discrete events, rather than as of a whole. We should all be alarmed.

As always my emphasis.

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